Enlighten Through Service     Edinburg 

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Home Club of District 5930 Governor 2003-2004 F.J. Brewerton

Edinburg

Enlighten Through Service

We meet Thursdays at 12:00 PM 
Echo Hotel
1903 S Closner Blvd
Edinburg, TX  78539
United States
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Home Page Stories

 
 

 
 
With the Leadership of the Edinburg Rotary Club we are proud to announce that our club has been recognized a a leader in membership growth in District 5930.
It is expected that the Edinburg Club will have over 60 members more than doubling the membership from 5 years earlier.
This accomplishment is not small feat, but the result of a Strategic Plan that was implemented to grow member and retain the ones already in the club.
 
With a steady focus over the last five presidents the Edinburg Rotary Club can be proud to say we are moving up in the right direction.
 
One must wonder how we will have meetings when we accomplish the goal set by President Fred Perez to grow by 12 more members during the 2014-2015 Rotary Year as we are sure to outgrow our current meeting room. 
 
There must be something in the water at the Echo Hotel because Edinburg Rotary is growing like weeds. We can't wait for the future.  Jane Cross President Elect and Area 10, 11 ,12 membership chair will look to continue growth.  Se will not only be a soldier in the Edinburg club but a beacon to help spark the light in other clubs as well.
 
I am proud to say I am an Edinburg Rotarian and a member of District 5930.
 
 
 

 
 
 

 

Drug wars, financial setbacks no match for Mexico clinic

 

About 300 miles south of Ciudad Juarez, one of Mexico's most dangerous cities, is the small town of Guerrero in central Chihuahua. The community is home to the Guerrero Clinic, which has weathered neighboring drug wars and financial setbacks to treat the poor since 1980.

Walter Branson, a member of the Rotary Club of Brazosport, Texas, in the United States, has been involved with the clinic since 1983. Branson says the governor of Chihuahua credits the clinic with providing 60 percent of indigent care in the state.

The drug wars in Mexico, which began in 2006, initially scared away U.S. volunteers. At one point, volunteers to Guerrero dipped to 20 volunteers from a high of 50. And in 2010, the clinic had to be canceled for six months after the U.S. State Department issued a travel ban to Mexico. Despite the cautious approach, Guerrero is not typically viewed to be as dangerous as some of the border towns in Chihuahua like Ciudad Juarez.

"I tell [volunteers] we're not going to take them to an area where we know there's a problem. We don't take that chance," Branson says.

It's taken not only the support of the community in Guerrero, but the cooperation of Rotary clubs in Southeast Texas and in northern Mexico to grow and sustain the clinic.

The clinic opens its doors and offers free health care services as often as six times a year. Optometry is its primary focus with up to 550 cataract surgeries performed each year, but it also offers cleft palate surgeries, skin grafts, cancer screenings, and pap smears. As many as 1,000 patients come through the clinic each week it operates.

Branson says people have been known to travel over 1,200 miles to be treated at the clinic, many because the services are free. He recalls one couple bringing their baby in to repair a cleft palate.

"They traveled from Acapulco to Guerrero because they had no money to pay for the surgery," he says.

Funding gaps

As the clinic has grown so has the cost to keep it running. To help with funding, several clubs in Mexico formed the nonprofit Rotary Foundation of Guerrero (Fundación Rotaria de Guerrero A.C.) in 2003. The foundation won loans through the federal health care program until loans were suspended in 2012.

Celso Reyes, of the Rotary Club of Torreón, says that the clubs in both countries have had to renew their fundraising tactics to recoup lost funding. Additionally, they have applied for various Rotary grants throughout the years; most recently they secured a matching grant sponsored by several clubs in Mexico. The clinic also relies on non-Rotary organizations such as Alcon Labs, a health and eye care company, for donations of medical supplies.

"It's one thing to hear about the work being done," Reyes says. "But [only] until you visit, until you're actually there and you see the profound change made in the lives of the people who get their vision back or have a cleft palate surgery, do you see how wonderful it is. It is a great experience."

Visit the Guerrero Clinic's and
Learn more about how

Rotary News

2-Jul-2014
 

 
 
The Edinburg Rotary Club and the Univesity of Texas Pan American are proud of PDG FJ Brewerton.
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

CAJUNFEST 2014 Sponsors- Thank you for your generosity that will aid in our humanitarian projects

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ok you have been asked to be a new Member of the Rotary Club. Why Join? What Do we do ? Why do we Do It? Many Rotarians ask this question and many do not know the answer. How can these Questions be answered? Stay Tuned
 
 
 

Speakers

Oct 16, 2014
Oct 30, 2014
Dr. Russ Skowronek
CHAPS and the RGV Civil War Trail
Nov 06, 2014
Cris Rivera, CEO for Rio Grande Regional Hospital
Upcoming changes to Rio Grande Regional Hospital
Nov 20, 2014
Dec 18, 2014
Jan 15, 2015
Feb 19, 2015
Mar 19, 2015
 
 

New member

Rotary International - Members of the Rotary Club of Seoul.
Rotary International - House of Friendship at the International Assembly, San Diego, California, USA.

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You make Rotary stronger. By adding your skills, experience, and enthusiasm to your club, you can advance communities at home and on a global scale. Together, we can eradicate polio, train more skilled peacemakers, and provide lasting solutions for communities fighting disease, hunger, illiteracy, and poverty.

Through the Rotary community, you can exchange ideas and build lifelong friendships with like-minded people. Take advantage of the resources and activities available through your club, district, and Rotary International to make your experience with Rotary both rewarding and fun.

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Here are some ideas:

  • Serve on a club committee where you can use your skills
  • Identify a need in your community and suggest a hands-on project to address it
  • Work with a youth service program sponsored by your club, such as Rotaract or Interact
  • Host a Youth Exchange student
  • Help organize your district’s Rotary Youth Leadership Awards programs
  • Recommend a colleague or friend for membership in your club

How can I meet other Rotarians?

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Explore Rotary’s global opportunities:

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  • Your sponsor
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History

Rotary's founder, Paul Harris
Rotary International history

Rotary has been dedicated to the idea of service for more than 100 years. Rotary History and Archives is the authority on Rotary’s rich, evolving history. Find out more about:

Our collections include:

  • Books written by Paul Harris and other Rotarians
  • Correspondence from past Rotary presidents and leaders
  • Photographs of Rotarians and Rotary events
  • Club banners, commemorative stamps, medals, statues, and awards
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Rotary’s archives are open to Rotarians, RI staff, and the public. Learn more about resources available to researchers, scheduling an appointment and submitting requests for information and copies.

We rely on you to help tell Rotary’s story. If you would like to donate a piece of Rotary history, please email us at history@rotary.org.

 

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Tips to help your club find and nurture a Youth Exchange host family
With 12 children -- six girls and six boys -- the Labordes hardly needed to add another member to their family. But they did: Over 40 years ago, Julia Mullikin, a Rotary Youth Exchange student from the United States, became like another daughter to this large family in Los Mochis, Sinaloa, Mexico. "She's been a blessing for us," says Maria Victoria Hallal de Laborde who was 18 when Mullikin arrived in 1973. Like many exchange students, Mullikin remains close to her host family. So close that when one of Laborde's sisters was diagnosed with a rare, fatal disease, Mullikin arranged to send the...
Free vegetable gardens sprouting up around France
Imagine a community where the residents are all free to plant, grow, harvest, and eat healthy food whenever they want without having to pay for it. Sound too good to be true? That's exactly what residents of more than 20 cities and towns in France are doing through a project called Potalib. Launched by the Rotaract Club of Versailles, Potalib was inspired by the Incredible Edible project, an international food-sharing movement founded by Nick Green in England. The Rotaract members obtained Green's permission to apply the concept in France, changing the name to "Potalib," a contraction of "...
 

Speakers

Oct 16, 2014
Oct 30, 2014
Dr. Russ Skowronek
CHAPS and the RGV Civil War Trail
Nov 06, 2014
Cris Rivera, CEO for Rio Grande Regional Hospital
Upcoming changes to Rio Grande Regional Hospital
Nov 20, 2014
Dec 18, 2014
Jan 15, 2015
Feb 19, 2015
Mar 19, 2015
 
 
The Edinburg Rotary Club and The Service Over Self Foundation are dedicated to these Areas of Focus 
  • Peace and conflict prevention/resolution
  • Disease prevention and treatment
  • Water and sanitation
  • Maternal and child health
  • Basic education and literacy
  • Economic and community development 
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